The Journal of Christian Healing

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  • Volume 29, Number 2 - Fall/Winter 2013
     

    Contents:

    Letter from the Editor

    Articles

    Becoming a Peacemaker: Spiritual Treatment of Anxiety
    Dale A. Matthews, MD

    Abstract

    Anxiety is a common problem in clinical settings and leads to medically-significant symptoms and psychosocial impairment. Conventional pharmacologic and psychological treatments are available and often effective, yet these approaches often miss an underlying spiritual problem: the patient’s inability to discover and maintain a sense of inner peace. Individuals may experience profound unworthiness, guilt, embarrassment, personal failure, and self-recrimination, which they believe may jeopardize their relationship to God. By helping patients overcome these emotions and beliefs through spiritual discovery, physical and emotional healing may occur. The Bible teaches that anxiety has been a companion to suffering since the earliest days of human experience and that relief of anxiety comes through faith in God. The stories of Adam and Eve, Moses, Joshua and Caleb, Gideon, and the disciples of Jesus teach important principles about anxiety and faith. Close and intimate fellowship with God produces peace and harmony, while separation from God produces anxiety and discord. Personal success is achieved not through personal accomplishment or talent, but by relying upon the presence and power of God himself. Faith in God’s promises and his protective presence leads to confidence and fulfillment, while faithlessness is accompanied by fear, disappointment, and death. To enhance the treatment of anxiety, patients and healthcare practitioners may choose to become peacemakers, which requires three elements: a) establishing peace with God; b) establishing peace with oneself; and c) establishing peace with others (family, friends, even enemies), by becoming “ambassadors of reconciliation.” The experience of receiving grace (unexpected and undeserved divine favor) from another or from God often propels the recipient to extend this grace to others. Patients who seek and pursue the peace of God in their own lives and in their interactions with others are likely to receive relief from anxiety. Healthcare practitioners who embody and promote the peace of God in their practices are likely to witness its healing benefits in their own lives as well as in those of their patients.

     

    Christian Theological Anthropology and its Implications for Spiritual Discernment
    Dominick D. Hankle, Ph.D

     Abstract

    There is a great deal of interest in applying spiritual interventions in a therapeutic setting. The Christian church has always benefitted from its rich history in spiritual direction and formation. Clients may expect clinicians to help them exercise discernment of God’s intentions for their lives when struggling with a multitude of stressors. Many therapists are not trained to assist clients in this manner since traditionally discernment is the subject of spiritual direction. Additionally, clinical programs are burdened with professional requirements and often lack the time to educate students in spiritual aspects of clinical work. This article presents key factors for clinicians to help clients utilize the rich Christian tradition of spiritual discernment. This article assists Christian counselors to frame spiritual decision making interventions based on a solid Christian anthropology and holistic appreciation of the discernment process.

     

    State Legislation and Sexually Exploited Youth: Protective Provisions, Reforms, and Implications for Christian Psychotherapists
    Aryssa Washington, MA
    Emma Bucher, BA
    Andrew Orayfig, BA

    Abstract
        Child or juvenile prostitution is illegal in all states in the United States. Unlike adult prostitution, in which the offender is assumed to be responsible for their actions, child prostitutes are typically considered to be victims of child sexual exploitation. Child sexual exploitation includes the use, persuasion, enticement, or coercion of a minor to engage in any sexually explicit conduct for personal or commercial gains. It is often subsumed under legislation regarding sexual exploitation, child trafficking, or sexual abuse, depending on the state. Federal legislation also considers child prostitution to be a form of sexual exploitation, and therefore a crime punishable by law. As a result of these conceptual distinctions, the legal system and members of the general population often view child prostitutes as victims of exploitation.
        Conversely, some U.S. state legislations allow for youth prostitutes to be treated by the legal system as criminals, or juvenile delinquents. Understanding the legislation related to child prostitution and how the legal system processes teenage youth is vital for informing future treatment modalities. In this paper, attention is given to societal perspectives and personal or demographic features of the youth, and how these dynamics influence the ambiguity regarding the legal processing and treatment of sexually exploited youth.
        Finally, assuming that child prostitutes are victims of sexual exploitation, we discuss implications for psychotherapy with child victims of sexual exploitation. The modules of Spiritually Oriented Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy are outlined and discussed to provide clinicians with an example of how to incorporate Christ into a therapy session with sexually exploited youth.


    Toward Wholeness: A Critical Evaluation of Self-Actualization and the Role of the Holy Spirit
    Tranese Morgan, BA
    Candyce Burke, MS

    Abstract

    There is a great deal of interest in applying spiritual interventions in a therapeutic setting. The Christian church has always benefitted from its rich history in spiritual direction and formation. Clients may expect clinicians to help them exercise discernment of God’s intentions for their lives when struggling with a multitude of stressors. Many therapists are not trained to assist clients in this manner since traditionally discernment is the subject of spiritual direction. Additionally, clinical programs are burdened with professional requirements and often lack the time to educate students in spiritual aspects of clinical work. This article presents key factors for clinicians to help clients utilize the rich Christian tradition of spiritual discernment. This article assists Christian counselors to frame spiritual decision making interventions based on a solid Christian anthropology and holistic appreciation of the discernment process.

     

    Integrating Healthcare and Christianity Takes a Community
    Stephen C. Wise, LCPC

    Abstract

    Interest in spirituality among healthcare professionals has grown in recent years. But there remains very little consensus on how a patient’s faith can be integrated into a therapist’s practice. While it is very important to not discriminate against any kind of client, especially on grounds of spirituality or faith, there is more that needs to be done to fully integrate Christianity into a healthcare practice for Christian patients. This article discusses the difference between healing and cure as it relates to Christian-integrated healthcare. We reflect on the role of physician as a healing assistant with a view to the ultimate healing of the patient. The requirements of serving as a healing assistant demonstrate that training is needed to develop competency in the treatment of Christian patients. Belonging to a Christian community is important both to develop competency in this area as well as to be empowered by the Body of Christ for God’s healing work. Online communities of practice contribute to training and to experiencing the immediacy of Christian community.


Price: $15.00

 

 

 


 

 

  • Volume 29, Number 1 - Spring/Summer 2013
     

    Contents:

    Letter from the Editor

    Articles

    A Christian Healing Energy Study: Statistical, Qualitative, and Factor Analytical Outcomes of a Survey of the Experience of Healing Energy among a Subgroup of the Association of Christian Therapists
    Charles Zeiders, PsyD, Audrey Jean-Jacques, BA, Sherira Fernandes, PhD and Douglas Schoeninger, PhD

     Abstract

    Objective: To examine the experiences and opinions of a group of Christian Health Care professionals regarding “energy healing.”

    Background: In the course of Christian healing ministry a sensation of energy can trigger the perception that God is mystically entering the clinical or health-relevant situation. This energy experience is epitomized in the Gospel According to Mark 5:24-31 wherein Jesus physically emanates “Virtue” or “Power” – here conceptualized as “energy” - into a hemorrhaging woman to cure her discharge of blood.

    Sample: The Association of Christian Therapists (ACT) is a society of Christian healthcare professionals comprised predominately of charismatic Roman Catholics. It is believed that the majority of surveyed respondents held Masters Degrees or Doctorates (mostly in mental health) and pursued careers in some area of allied healthcare.

    Methods: The Christian Healing Energy Survey (CHES) was available on the Internet via the SurveyMonkey® website. The CHES asked forced-choice questions regarding respondents’ energy healing opinions and experiences. On August 4, 2011, the survey was opened, and it was closed on September 7, 2011. A web link was distributed in an official letter to members of the Association of Christian Therapists (ACT), inviting 416 ACT members in the organization’s listserv to complete the survey. Out of the 77 respondents who opened the survey, only 41 people completed it. Only the data of survey completers was used for data analysis. The sample were asked questions about their experience of energy in the course of Christian healing and their experiences and attitudes regarding controversial non-Christian energy practices, whether eastern or science-based. Data collection involved metric and written reposes to items.

    Data Analysis: CHES data was analyzed in 4 ways: 1) Percentage of Yes/No responses for each item; 2) Qualitative analysis of written responses. 3) Factor analysis, and 4) Trend analysis.

    Results:
    1) Percentage outcomes indicate a sample generally experienced with and friendly to energy healing within and outside of the Christian tradition.
    2) Qualitative analysis of written responses included the finding that charismatic healthcare professionals may call upon God during extreme clinical encounters and experience God energetically;
    3) Factor analysis established three factors, provisionally named:
    a. Degree of beneficial God-centered energy experience,
    b. Degree of beneficial secular-scientific energy experience, and
    c. Degree of belief in the “centerability” of non-Christian energy practices.
    4) Trend analysis showed a tendency in the data such that respondents who affirm that non-Christian energy modalities can be Christ- centered respond more positively to items throughout the CHES –a finding that points to a Christocentricity Effect.
    Due to sampling limitations and positive bias within CHES questions, findings cannot be generalized to ACT or the larger population of Christian healthcare professionals.

     

    Responses to: A Christian Healing Energy Survey Receptivity to Clinical and Spiritual Practices
    Len Sperry, MD, PhD, DMin

    Limitations of this Survey and Thoughts for Future Inquiry
    Karen Cichon, PhD

    Nature and Grace
    Robert T. Sears, SJ, PhD

    Discernment of Energy Healing
    Robert Sears, SJ, PhD

     Abstract

    Energy healing has been getting more and more coverage in our day, but most practitioners use a “New Age” way of understanding it. The effectiveness of energy healing, affirmed by scientific research, is created by God and it is incumbent on a Christian healing association to attempt to understand in light of Christian faith. This article makes such an attempt, first by determining what is scientifically verifiable in different views of energy. It then develops an understanding of the relation between nature and grace, seen in a developmental framework, and shows the importance of a full openness to nature for a more complete understanding of God. Finally, we center the ultimate ground of energy in the death/resurrection of Jesus and develop principles of discernment that would flow from such a “graced” understanding of energy healing. These principles are then applied to three areas of energy healing – meditation, laying on of hands, and prayer for healing.

Price: $15.00

 


 

 

  • Volume 28, Number 2 - Fall/Winter 2012

Contents:

Letter from the Editor

Articles

Wholeheartedness in Healthcare: Caring for the Whole Person
with the Healing Heart and Mind of Jesus
Mary Jean Ricci, BSN

 Abstract

Wholeheartedness is unconditional commitment and devotion to God and one’s patients. In healthcare work one needs to make sense of what is happening: pain, suffering and yes, miracles. God’s plan can help one to recognize the value of completing ordinary tasks in an extraordinary way. Patient care, even technical interventions, and maintenance of peer relationships, are then completed out of love. And love contributes to well-being.

The key to well-being is prayer. Prayer needs to be the soul of our existence. If a day or a day’s work begins with prayer then there is the intention of fulfilling the will of God. One is starting one’s day with the outcome in mind of assisting others to achieve physical well-being. Prayer is offering the day to the Lord, trusting that God has a plan and will reveal His plan, and can make sense of what is happening with patients and colleagues in the clinical setting.

Spirituality enables one to be a humble servant of God in caring for others. Striving to be whole in clinical practice is accomplished through engaging the spiritual values of faith, hope and charity by the power and presence of the Holy Spirit. Further, working and living in gratitude contributes to well-being. Prayer helps us to hear God’s voice and prepare ourselves wholeheartedly to serve others through one’s work of serving and assisting in the healing process. Through the recognition of the abundant flow of grace in our lives and sharing our abundance through small acts of kindness one practices wholeheartedness and witnesses for Christ. Life and work provides exposure to experiences that result in spiritual growth and well-being for provider and patient alike.


The Nature of Human Suffering
Michael Brescia, MD

 Abstract
 

      I’m going to talk about family, about physical suffering, and I’ll give you a few perspectives on medical treatment of oncology patients and their families, and a little bit on grief.

Anyone that comes to work for me in our hospital, who thinks that somehow they can skirt relating to the patient’s families has to leave, because 90% of our energy is spent with families. Why is that? Because cancer “metastasizes” to the family first. Families suffer the death of a loved one and their own life is changed forever. Sit down and tell the families the truth, at least, and later on, in your own way, care for the family. This is the art of medicine. The science is in the bed, but the art is with the family. I work hard with my physicians and nurses and all healthcare participants to accept and honor the families.

In our hospital we receive patients with a constellation of symptoms that are unbearable and unmanageable only because there weren’t competent medical personnel, compassionate people, providing medications and spiritual, mental and emotional care. If you don’t see Christ in the room and you don’t genuflect and you don’t say, “I’m here, Lord, to glorify thee,” then this becomes an almost intolerable job.


Responding to Fear in these Troubled Times
Len Sperry, MD, PhD, DMin

 Abstract
   

     American society today is increasingly consumed by fear and anxiety. Diminished confidence and distrust in our social systems has become painfully apparent. While most react negatively to these and other fear-provoking concerns, it is possible to respond in a neutral and even positive manner. Despite the bleak and pessimistic portrait of life today that the mass media presents 24/7, there are some compelling reasons to be optimistic and to respond positively or at least neutrally. Recent research shows that elements of effective psychotherapy such as a therapist’s warmth, empathy and positive regard, along with therapeutic discussion, can create a mental state that fosters neuroplasticity, allowing for higher-level responses. In their book, Abundance: The Future is Better than You Think, Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler provide a broad perspective on life today that offers a compellingly optimistic alternative to the pessimistic, crisis-riddled view of many, if not most, Americans. We will soon have the ability to meet and exceed the basic needs of every man, woman and child on the planet” (Diamandis and Kotler, 2012).

     Prayer and faith provide override strategies. The Christian vision of life and grace, the gift of faith and scriptural admonitions not to fear but to trust God are very powerful strategies to overcome fear. The challenge is to respond to fear and anxiety from an inner center of strength reflecting faith, trust and courage with calmness, equanimity and composure.


Do You Need Time to Talk: We Have Time to Listen
Dr. Harriet Mowat

 Abstract
   

This paper reports the results of an evaluation of a new listening service provided for General Practice patients by healthcare chaplaincy volunteers in Inverness, Scotland. The service discussed in this paper offers the opportunity to patients who are visiting their General Practitioners to tell their story to listeners who are trained to “hear well” and in so doing help the talker unravel and understand themselves and their actions and behaviours better. There were four listeners all trained through The Acorn listening model (www.acorninscotland.org.uk).

This pilot listening service started in January 2010. The evaluation was commissioned in April 2010 and ethical permission granted for the research in June 2010. The project continues but the data collection period ceased in March 2011.This was intended to be a simple descriptive study which sought to ask patients, GP staff and listeners about their experience of the listening service. In total some 70 patients attended the listening service across four Practices.

On the whole patients were very pleased with the listening service. They understood the concept of listening without too much difficulty, and thought that they had learnt to manage themselves better as a consequence of the experience.

They acknowledged that the GPs have limited time and they knew that they needed time to tell their story. The patients didn’t have to wait and since the things they were preoccupied with were “immediate” this was very helpful. The waiting lists for psychology, psychiatry and other talking therapies are long.

The themes that came out of the data suggested that patients who participated in the listening sessions were calmer, more able to talk to family, and build and sustain better relationships with family, more able to return to church, accept the death of a loved one, leave the past behind, change a way of thinking, socialize, and were keeping a diary and reading more.

The listeners and the materials produced by the pilot project emphasised the importance of the listeners being seen as part of the treatment team.


Joy, Salvation, Leadership, Depression, and the Christian: A Potential Dilemma?
Audrey Jean-Jacques, BA

 Abstract

     Many Christian leaders, including clergy and writers (Herring, 2011) imply that Christians should not be depressed because Christians have joy. This paper rebuts that conclusion, and argues 1) that Christian lay persons believe that believers can become depressed; 2) that Christian lay persons believe that Christians can possess joy and be depressed simultaneously; and 3) that if Christian leadership fails to view depression as a serious mental illness that can occur in a Christian’s lifetime, then depressive symptoms can be exacerbated. A survey of Christians was utilized to assess their opinions about depression, joy, and how one copes with depression as a believer.


Survey of Idolatry and American Culture
Charles Zeiders, PsyD

 Abstract
 

   Both the Old and New Testaments warn against idolatry, of having gods before God. This paper provides findings from a survey of idolatry and American culture from a convenience sample of American Christians to drive discussion regarding the extent to which American culture may foster the love and worship of false gods over God. The article includes remarks about the theology and psychology of idolatry, and a discussion of the survey methodology and its findings.


An Interview Regarding the Psychologist of Faith and the Post-Modern Moment
Charles Zeiders, PsyD and Douglas Schoeninger, PhD

 Abstract
 

     A culmination of experiences leaves me concerned and excited about the current historical situation and the crisis in the Western mind. Sartorius (2009) wrote that “Nothingness” is a new archetype in the Western mind. He argues simply that it is a fact of our Western mass mind that we tend toward an experience of pure materiality and meaninglessness. Pre-moderns looked for God beyond the rational. Moderns idealize rationality with or without God. Post-moderns find both faith and reason bereft. Meaninglessness contradicts human nature. Human beings simply cannot tolerate nihilism. Giant commercial interests promulgate substitutionary values for ultimate values. In other words economic institutions are predominantly filling the post-modern spiritual void with false gods. On the other hand, the Christian psychologist understands that human nature has an essence. And that essence transcends science, and historical epochs, and stands out in creation with God’s delighted endorsement, because most essentially to be human is to be loved. It is lovability, being loved, that grounds human nature, not dystopia and its discontents. A Christian psychologist can uphold the pre-modern belief that God is real and that God saves and loves human beings, and practice psychotherapy, and subscribe to the modernist notion that social science can make the individual and the world a better place. Social science can be in a state of grace. Faith and reason combine against the nihilism of the post-modern moment. Rather than leading to pessimism, nihilism, and addiction, this approach opens the way to hope, meaning, and sustainability.


Price: $15.00

 


 


  • Volume 28, Number 1 - Spring/Summer 2012

Contents:

Letter from the Editor

Articles

Marital Spirituality: Living the Trinity, A Framework for Integrating Relationship Enhancement
With Spiritual Growth in Marital Interventions
Kenneth M. Flanagan, PhD and Kim Flanagan, BS

 Abstract
    There seems to be growing agreement that marriage is being challenged and is in decline in the United States and in many other parts of the world. This article discusses factors that have contributed to the decline of marriage during recent decades. These factors, however, provide us with the opportunity to highlight how a marriage, which is based upon a spiritual foundation, can witness to its vitality and how through marriage an individual and couple can experience transformation.

     A spirituality of marriage can provide a foundation upon which to build a lifelong relationship which leads to the two becoming one. This article provides a framework by which therapists and pastoral counselors can intervene with couples in a way that recognizes the spiritual dimension of the relationship. The framework is Trinitarian and is focused upon four key characteristics associated with the Trinity and applies these characteristics to the marital relationship. These characteristics are permanence, self-revelation (communication), mutuality and other directedness (service). The framework which is presented can be incorporated into marriage preparation, marital therapy, pastoral care and/or couple coaching. The promotion of behaviors that enhance the marital relationship and integrates these behaviors with spirituality is a crucial issue for our faith communities today.



Religious Involvement, Spiritual Transcendence, and Disability Acceptance in
Individuals with Neuromuscular Disorders
Jessica Rupp Evans, MA, Pamela Pressley Abraham, PsyD,
Marie McGrath, PhD and Jeannine O’Kane, IHM, PhD

Abstract
The purpose of this study is to explore religious involvement, spiritual transcendence, and the degree of acceptance of disability present in adults with neuromuscular disorders (NMDs). One hundred and thirty adult participants, all of whom reported that they had previously been diagnosed with a NMD, were recruited through the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Participants completed an electronic survey containing items from the Adjustment to Disability Scale-Revised (ADS-R) and Assessment of Spirituality and Religious Sentiments (ASPIRES). Spearman rank order correlations were utilized to explore the relationships between Spiritual Transcendence and Acceptance of Disability, and Religiosity and Acceptance of Disability, for people with NMDs. Contrary to predictions, neither Spiritual Transcendence nor Religiosity were significantly correlated with Acceptance of Disability, using the aforementioned measures. However, an exploratory analysis indicated a significant negative correlation between Religious Crisis and Acceptance of Disability scores.



Strengthening the Spirit and Restoring the Soul: Identifying, Understanding and Healing the Blocks
with the Father, Son and Holy Spirit
Margaret Nagib, PsyD and Kara Miller, BA, MA

Abstract
Many treatment providers claim to address the individual’s treatment needs “body, soul and spirit.” But what does this really mean and how do we as treatment providers do this? In this paper, we discuss the importance of the tripartite nature of man and how this nature corresponds with the triune God. We will present the importance of the much-neglected spirit in current healing work. Additionally, we will introduce Sozo, a practical inner healing tool used to identify the blocks that keep individuals from fully interacting with the Godhead (Father, Son and Holy Spirit). This tool assists the clinician’s work to restore the individual’s intimacy with God, utilizing the core Christian value of forgiveness. Sozo, with the guidance of the clinician and through the power of the Holy Spirit, identifies and breaks off the lies that block an individual in their relationship with God and releases the truth of identity, who God is, and the freedom He has for each individual.



Conducting Psychoeducational Groups to Enhance Social, Emotional, Cognitive and
Spiritual Skills of Clients to Promote Resiliency and Inner Healing
Rosemary Thompson, EdD, LPC, NCC, NCSC, CRS, DAPA and Elizabeth Linstead, Graduate Student

Abstract
Clients across the nation are increasingly manifesting serious social, emotional, cognitive, and spiritual deficits. The indicators of emotional deficits manifest themselves in increased incidents of violence, suicide and homicides. Social deficits manifest themselves with poor interpersonal relationships, an inability to resolve conflicts and manage anger. Cognitive deficits place clients and adults at a disadvantage academically reducing their career options and making them more vulnerable to criminal influences. Spiritual deficits can affect every area of life. Spiritual deficits correlate simultaneously with the cognitive, emotional, and social development. Primarily these spiritual deficits documented are wrath, greed, sloth, pride, lust, envy, and gluttony. Spirituality is an awareness of a force that transcends the material aspects of life and gives a deep sense of wholeness or connectedness to the universe and inner healing. This article will identify more than 200 social, emotional, cognitive and spiritual deficits using a six step psychoeducational life skill mode that can be easily implemented with clients to remediate dysfunctional behaviors, promote resiliency and maximize human potential.



Clergy’s Response to Religious Service Opportunities of Individuals with
Intellectual Developmental Disabilities
Maria Cuddy-Casey, PhD, Reneé Richey, AA, BS, Rachel Hallinan and Stewart Shear, PhD

Abstract
Previous studies have shown that it is important for parishes to provide opportunities for religious instruction and participation for individuals with developmental disabilities (IDD). Developmentally disabled individuals themselves have reported an overwhelming desire to participate more in spiritual activities. The purpose of this study was to survey local churches to determine their preparedness and experience in serving these individuals. Twenty-two completed surveys were returned reporting clergy’s perceptions of their own and their congregations’ preparedness and willingness to enhance spiritual opportunities for individuals with developmental disabilities. Results indicated that the majority of clergy did not have formal training or in-service hours in serving individuals with developmental disabilities (81.81% and 76.19% respectively). Clergy rated their parishioners slightly lower (but not statistically significant) in their willingness to assist and create a welcoming environment for individuals with developmental disabilities as compared to the clergy’s own responses.


Great Is Thy Faithfulness: A Healing Journey through the Book of Lamentations
Dominica Rafferty, MS, NCC

Abstract
    While all of mankind seems to have an innate yearning for beauty, we all find ourselves looking into the ugly face of torment and pain at some point in our life. How do we react to this pain, this attack to our well planned life? How do we endure the unendurable? Who is there to help us, to hear our lament? Do we feel comfortable enough with God’s promise of everlasting love to come to him both in sorrow and in anger? Can we rest in the assurance that God will welcome our angry rages, as well as our laments? How will we be healed, when the grief is unbearable?

     While many people know that they can turn to God for solace and strength, in times of grief or anger, it is not uncommon to find people who do not avail themselves of the gift of the lament. There is a certain beauty in grief, available to be experienced in tandem with God’s constant loving presence. This presence is never diminished, nor is his great love for us ever compromised. Pouring one’s heart out in grief is one way of providing a channel for God’s love. Oftentimes grieving encompasses anger and rage, not only at earthly influences, but at God as well. The Book of Lamentations provides an invitation to experience grief in the fullness of a hope that is full of assurances that God can and does welcome our sorrow as well as our rage and our anger. Hope is at the center of Lamentations, just as healing is always available to us through God.

      This paper will develop a study of the Book of Lamentations as a resource for those who are grieving. It will also be a resource for those who are angry with God. It will provide a framework for working with clients who are in distress, agony, or grief. A voice will be made available to those who might not otherwise know what to do with their anger. This paper will map out a journey that will illustrate the respite and healing that is available when experiencing God’s welcoming acceptance of laments and anger.


How Bandura’s Modeling Theory Compares to Paul's “Follow Me as I Follow Christ”
2LT Ryan S. Calhoun, MA, Ryan J. Adams, MA and R. LaVerne Washington, MA

Abstract
This article seeks to compare the basic concepts of Bandura’s theory of modeling to one of Christianity’s most exemplary models, the Apostle Paul. Further examination of Bandura’s social cognitive theory and its relatedness to Paul’s prototypic example revealed an emphasis on learning through vicarious experience. Bandura’s four basic models of observational learning, live models, verbal instructional and symbolic models, were each examined in relation to Paul’s methods of teaching. Each of these basic models was identified in the methods used by Paul. The broader implications of Bandura’s theory are far-reaching and relevant to clinical practice. Bandura’s theory reflects the therapeutic alliance in the exchange of vicarious experiences between observer and learner. This theory also speaks to broader social and environmental factors that impact the therapeutic alliance. The therapist’s vicarious experience of client’s suffering, and the client’s indirect experience of the therapist’s self-efficacy present invaluable learning opportunities that facilitate mutual growth. Thus, a greater understanding of Bandura’s theory and the use of modeling are essential, as this premise offers perspectives that are clinically relevant to the collaborative therapeutic process.


Gnosticism, Reductionism, and the Christian Theological Implications for Holistic Counseling
Dominick M. Hankle, PhD
 

Abstract
Psychology is a discipline whose primary focus is the human person. This fact alone requires psychologists to define the construct “human person.” In regards to Christian therapy, it is assumed that a Christian anthropology guides the manner in which the therapist understands and plans interventions for his or her clients. However, Christian therapists often uncritically utilize contemporary psychological theories unwittingly adopting an anthropology incompatible with a Christian worldview. This article attempts to review how Gnosticism and reductionism are implied anthropological perspectives of most psychological theory and compare that to a Christian theological anthropology. After providing this comparison, some possible directions for assessment of clients in the Christian therapeutic setting are proposed. In this way, the holistic benefits of Christian therapy can be utilized to assist clients seeking a truly Christian counseling experience.

 

Price: $15.00

 



  • Volume 27, Number 2 - Fall/Winter 2011

Contents:

Letter from the Editor

Articles

Evaluating Clinical Cases Using Clinical, Ethical, Spiritual,
And Contextual-Cultural Competence Criteria: Part I
By Len Sperry, MD, PhD, DMin

This article is the first of a two-part series on clinical case evaluation. It describes a straightforward and easy to use quantitative method to evaluate clinical cases. This method includes four domains; clinical, ethical, spiritual, and contextual-cultural; and these domains are specified with competence-based criteria. These criteria provide Christian healthcare professionals tools to evaluate the overall outcomes of completed cases, as well as for monitoring ongoing progress and making mid course changes in treatment direction and interventions in a particular case. 



Evaluating Clinical Cases Using Clinical, Ethical, Spiritual,
And Contextual-Cultural Competence Criteria: Part II
By Len Sperry, MD, PhD, DMin

Abstract
This article is the second of a two part series on clinical case evaluation. It illustrates the use the quantitative method for evaluating clinical cases described in Part I. The method includes four domains; clinical, ethical, spiritual, and contextual-cultural, with specific competence-based criteria. These criteria provide Christian healthcare professionals a tool for evaluating the overall outcomes of completed cases, as well as for monitoring ongoing progress and making mid course changes in treatment direction and interventions in a particular case.



Spiritual Bypass: When Religious Practice Blocks Growth and Healing
By Gwen M. White, PsyD

Abstract
For practitioners working with devout Christian clients, the individual’s faith can be a great benefit in the process of healing and paradoxically can also present a block to the individual’s growth and recovery. Spiritual bypass is a term used by a number of authors in academic and popular psychology to describe a person’s use of spiritual belief, experience or practice to avoid psychological issues that evoke anxiety (Bibee, 2000; Cashwell, Myers, & Shurts, 2004; Michaelson, 2005; Whitfield, 1987). For clients who experience spiritual bypass, belief structures that once were helpful have become rigid and maladaptive. This article examines this impasse from several theoretical perspectives and offers a case study to explore clinical implications and potential interventions for working with such individuals. 



Humans and the Environment: A Resurrection View from God’s Self-Emptying Love
By Robert Sears, SJ, PhD

Abstract
Lynn White argued that Christianity, in desacralizing nature, opened it for exploitation. This article examines that question in light of two scriptural and tradition approaches to Christianity and the environment - ascent spirituality and ecological motif - and integrates them in a view of what it calls “God’s self-emptying love” and the resurrection of Jesus. It then looks at Jesus’ attitude to the environment by way of St. Ignatius of Loyola’s Spiritual Exercises and finally draws implications for understanding the Christian’s role in caring for the environment and for relevant action.


 

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  • Volume 27, Number 1 - Spring/Summer 2011

Contents:

Letter from the Editor

Articles

Christian Holistic Healthcare Practice:
Formation Curriculum for the Association of Christian Therapists (ACT)
A Basic Course
By Robert Sears, SJ, PhD, Douglas Schoeninger, PhD, Donna Alberici, PhD,
Ellysha MacIvor Baker, RN, Kenneth Fung, MD, Betty Igo, SFP, MS, MEd
Gloria Tipton, MSW, EdD, MS and Forrest Yanke, DPhil, LCSW, LMFT

Abstract

This document is the first step in developing a formation curriculum for the Association of Christian Therapists (ACT). Attaining this goal required that ACT clarify the assumptions and characteristics of a holistic Christian therapist and outline the dimensions that would need to be considered in his or her formation. This paper provides the basis for the first and basic course in ACT’s developing curriculum. It is published here for the study and critique of ACT members and other interested readers. In Section I, the Core Assumptions of this view of Christian Holistic Healthcare are presented and followed by their implications and benefits. In Section II, the educational and spiritual preparation of a Christian Holistic Healthcare Provider is treated according to three stages: 1) beginning conversion to Jesus’ Spirit, 2) deepening in the way of Jesus as outlined in the Beatitudes, and 3) developing skills to reach out to healthcare institutions. Section III considers the operational preparation for the practice of Christian Holistic Healthcare, for cooperating with God’s Spirit in every dimension of one’s practice – self, client/patient, place, general assessment and ethical practice.


A Multi-disciplinary Discussion of the God-Inspired Dreams of an Institutionalized
Roman Catholic Schizoaffective Patient
By Charles Zeiders, PsyD, with multi-disciplinary commentary by:
Len Sperry, MD, PhD, DMin, Guylan Paul, BS, MA, MDiv, DMin,
and James DeMar, PhD, LCSW

Abstract

The medical model is a testament to human ingenuity and to how fearfully and wonderfully we are made. It is a model that enables us to diagnose and treat mental illness with incredible efficiency. The Christian clinician, however, finds it humbling and inspiring to witness God break into human paradigms and procedures like diagnosis and treatment. This article examines the healing of the identity of a man diagnosed with Schizoaffective Disorder. This patient came to identify with his diagnosis. Hyper exposure to the medical model of mental illness drove him to develop an iatrogenic, or treatment induced, conception of himself. He identified himself as a Schizoaffective man, as opposed to a health-positive self-identification such as “Imago Dei.” Following the presentation of case material, focused mainly on God-inspired dreams, a multi-disciplinary panel explores the patient’s dreams from medical, spiritual, and psychological perspectives. What follows is a redacted version of a presentation to the Association of Christian Therapists Healing Manual Preconference Seminar (HMPS) made in Little Rock, Arkansas during the 2007 International Conference of the Association of Christian Therapists. This print version is a joint publication of the HMPS and the Think Tank for Christian Holism of the Institute for Christian Healing (ICH).


Spirituality in Values-Based Leadership: How and Why Christian Counselors should
Consider marketing themselves to current and future Leaders in America’s Corporations!

An interview with Michele Sacher
By Michele Sacher, MEC, MS and Charles Zeiders, PsyD

Abstract

This article presents for consideration a challenge to Christian counselors to reach out to corporate leaders with “Unconventional Counseling Techniques”®; There is a unique opportunity to address an epidemic of decreased values-based leadership in corporate America and the resulting decay of organizational and individual mental health, energy, and wellness. Also considered are the resulting lessons we are teaching the next generation of future leaders and a challenge to proactively reach out as counselors to model values-based leadership!


The Healing Harvester
By Arlene Brown, PsyD, NCC

Abstract

Sometime we humans may find ourselves questioning God. We may ask Him for the reasons behind His allowing so much pain and suffering to fill our lives and the world. Yet, being too impatient to wait for the reply, we move on and try to rectify these difficulties on our own. This writer has often asked these questions and prayed for an answer, then it occurred to me that most of the pain and suffering I had experienced, I had brought upon myself. Yes, you see God usually provides us with the instructions to solve our problems in a subtle manner. His goal is to heal our pain and suffering whether it is physical or spiritual. Our heavenly Father is like a tireless farmer who toils from sunup to sundown anticipating a healthy crop. He is a wise and loving farmer. He is ever so patient with us. He toils in our fields both day and night. When we are awake and when we are asleep, He is still nurturing us. However, He is not an enforcer rather He is a harvester, a harvester who plants seeds yet has provided us with freewill and the ability to make choices. Thus, when we choose our own course instead of yielding to the guidance of His plow our healing is delayed. We must remember that we are not the planter but rather the field in which He plants His seeds. Only when we yield to His harvesting will we be truly healed.


Reader Reflections and Feedback

 

Price: $15.00

 



  • Volume 26, Number 2 - Fall/Winter, 2010

Contents:

Letter from the Editor

Articles

Interrupted Love:
Healing Addiction through the Hearts of Jesus and Mary
by Robert Sears, SJ, PhD

Abstract

Humans have an innate desire for union with God. Addiction attaches that desire and enslaves that energy to specific behaviors, things or people. Bill Wilson found that encounter with God’s love freed him from addiction to drink. His AA principles followed from that awareness and his later experience. However his addictions to smoking and women revealed limits in his approach. Consideration of Chris Prentiss’ and Arthur Janov’s ideas about facing primal pain at the root of addictions, and the need for companionship and joy (Jim Wilder) to face that pain, leads us to the hearts of Jesus and Mary. Using Henri Nouwen's experience of working through his deep pain, this article presents Mary as model of the church empowered to stay open to Jesus who carried our primal pain in his cry of abandonment on the cross (John's view at Cana and Calvary) with the resultant release of joy and community. It concludes with suggestions for healing addictions.

 

The Metamorphic Moment:
A Psychology of Fire and Love for the Postmodern Day of Judgment
By Charles Zeiders, PsyD

Abstract

Like the 1st century, the 21st century is poised for sudden change at the level of individual and collective psychology. Exploring the experience of Jesus, Peter and John on the Mount of Transfiguration, this article provides a depth psychological perspective on assenting to the radical psychological requirements of sudden development, and bowing to God’s radical psychological commands in the face of such development. Among these commands are Jesus’ summary of the law and the prophets; his commandments to love God and neighbor in reciprocal love. By assenting to Transfiguration and by assenting to Jesus’ command to love both God and man, psychological development expands to such an extent that emotions like fear, at personal and collective evolutionary shifts, are ameliorated. Following analysis of the 3 developmental epochs of the Western mind, Zeiders argues that personal alignment with God’s transformative power is critical to addressing the pathology in - and the developmental crisis of - the individual and collective postmodern Western soul. Drawn from St. John’s 1st universal letter, the words, “The Day of Judgment,” refer to the current crisis in the soul of Western civilization. The “Metamorphic Moment” refers to the entrainment of the individual healthcare provider and mystic/activist for individual transformation in service to God, man, and God’s evolutionary plans for the Western soul.

 

Ethical Sensitivity in Christian Healthcare Practice
By Len Sperry, MD, PhD, DMin

Abstract

Ethical sensitivity enables healthcare professionals to respond morally to the suffering and vulnerability of those receiving clinical services. Because it is a prerequisite for effective ethical analysis and ethical decision making, Christian healthcare professionals need to understand and emphasize ethical sensitivity in their practice. This article describes and illustrates this essential construct.

 

An Approach to Ethical Case Analysis: Application to Breast Cancer
By Len Sperry, MD, PhD, DMin and Louis Lussier, MI, MD, PhD, MDiv

Abstract

An approach to ethical analysis in Christian healthcare practice is described. This approach is based on the premise that ethically-sensitive practice is clinically and professionally-sensitive practice that accounts for contextual and theological-spiritual considerations. A case involving breast cancer is analyzed. Like other serious medical conditions, various psychological, cultural, spiritual, and systemic factors can exacerbate the course of breast cancer and complicate its treatment. Since it is essential that the competent and compassionate practice of Christian healthcare account for these various factors, the ethical analysis approach described here considers all of these factors.

 

Price: $15.00

 


 

  • Volume 26, Number 1 - Spring/Summer 2010

Contents:

Letter from the Editor

Articles

The System Has to be Kept Human:
Integrating Spirituality into Contemporary Healthcare
by Russ Parker, BA(Hons)Theol, MTh, Ddiv

Integrative Mental Health Treatment for Alcoholism
And the Christ of Recovery
by Charles Zeiders, PsyD

HEART- Healing Emotional Affective Responses to Trauma:
Clinical Applications, Part II
by Benjamin B. Keyes, ThD, PhD, EdD

Theology and Energy Healing
by Robert Sears, SJ, PhD

Price: $15.00

 


 

  • Volume 25, Number 2 - Fall/Winter 2009

Contents:

Letter from the Editor

Articles
Monograph published by the Journal of Christian Healing:
Ethics in Christian Healthcare Practice
by Len Sperry, MD, PhD, DMin

-Ethics in Christian Healthcare Practice: An Introduction and Overview
-An Ethics Primer on Christian Healthcare Practice
-Developing Ethical Competence in Christian Healthcare Practice
-Ethical Analysis in Christian Healthcare Practice
-Application of Ethical Analysis in Christian Healthcare Practice
-Ethical, Professional, and Spiritual Discernment in Christian Healthcare Practice
-Ethics and the Role of Christian Anthropology in Christian Healthcare Practice

Price: $15.00

 


 

  • Volume 25, Number 1 - Spring/Summer 2009

Contents:

Letter from the Editor

Articles

HEART- Healing Emotional Affective Responses to Trauma: Clinical Applications
by Benjamin B. Keyes, ThD, PhD, EdD

Fighting the Monster
by James Ashdown

Anxiety and Fear: Where Can We Rest?
by Douglas Schoeninger, PhD

The Great Discovery of Karl and Will Menninger
by Daniel V. Leander, MEd., MTh


Listening Post

Contending for Your Healing
By Deborah Otter, RN

The Action of the Holy Spirit in Clinical Practice: Sharing Our Experiences
By Douglas Schoeninger, PhD

Price: $15.00

 


 

  • Volume 24, Number 2 – Fall/Winter, 2008

Contents:

Letter from the Editor

Articles
Inner Healing: The Co-creation of Emotional Transcendence
by Benjamin B. Keyes, Th.D., Ph.D., Ed.D., LPC

The Trauma of the Broken Church: Healing Through Ecumenism
by Robert T. Sears, S.J., Ph.D.

A Perspective on Neurotheology
by Charles L. Zeiders, Psy.D.

Listening Post
Exploring Energy Medicine and New Paradigms
by Sheila Hogan Waldeck, R.N.

Notes on Christian Healthcare Practice
by Douglas Schoeninger, Ph.D.

Just Wondering
by Robin Caccese, BS, MT (ASCP)

Price: $15.00

 


 

  • Volume 24, Number 1 – Spring/Summer, 2008

Contents:

Letter from the Editor

Articles
Is There a Scriptural Approach to Mental Health?
by Robert T. Sears, S.J., Ph.D.

PneumasomaticTM Care
by Jo Anne Grace, Ph.D.

Christian Anthropology: The Nature of the Human Person, Human
Brokenness and Healing: A Spiritual/Theological Perspective
by Louis Lussier, M.I., M.D., Ph.D., M.Div.

The Spiritual Healing of a Father and His Daughter
by Gaylene Baier, R.N.


Listening Post

Just Wondering
by Robin Caccese, BS, MT(ASCP)

Price: $15.00

 


 

  • Volume 23, Number 2 - Fall/Winter, 2007

Contents:

Letter from the Editor

Articles
Case C – My Name is Schizoaffective Disorder
by Charles Zeiders, Psy.D.

Principles of Inner Healing
by Sister Betty Igo, S.F.P., M.S., M.Ed.

Dorothy Kerin: Sign and Significance
by Stevens Heckscher, Obl. OSB, Ph.D.

Christian Anthropology for the Healthcare Professions:
The Nature of the Human Person, Human Brokenness and Healing
by Douglas Schoeninger, Ph.D.

Listening Post

Just Wondering
by Robin Caccese, BS, MT (ASCP)

 

Price: $15.00

 


 

  • Volume 23, Number 1 - Spring/Summer, 2007

Contents:

Articles
Agnes Sanford: Pioner in Healing Ministry
And Apostle of the Healing Light of Christ
by Judith Agaoglu, Psy.D.

A Christian Clinical Medical Model
for Healing Human Brokeness
by Keneth Fung, M.D., MB, B.Ch., B.A.O., FRCS

Neurobiological Mechanisms and Christian Healing
by Len Sperry, M.D., Ph.D., D.Min.

The Case Study of C.G.
by Lise Poirier-Groulx, M.D., FCFP, CGP

Listening Post

 

Price: $15.00

 


 

  • Volume 17,  Number 4 - Winter, 1995

Contents:

Letter from the Editor

Articles
Amazed by the Authority of Jesus
by Charles L. Kaldahl, M.Div.

Touching the Children
by Paul Elledge, Ph.D.

Creating A Healing Milieu: A Christian Summer Camp
by Anne Gremillion Trufant, M.S.W.

Life with Noah: Growing Toward Wholeness through Parenting a Handicapped Child
by Karen Kozica Cichon, Ph.D.

Healing Experience
My Personal Experience with Deliverance Prayer
by Janet M. Kamer, Ph.D.

Resources

Book Reviews
James Schaller
The Search for Lost Fathering: Rebuilding Your Father Relationship
Reviewed by Len Sperry, M.D., Ph.D.

Dan Montgomery
God and Your Personality
Reviewed by Robert T. Sears, S.J.

Book Summaries

Journal Listings

News

Report on the Harvard Conference: “Spirituality and Health in Medicine,”
by Louis Lussier, O.S.Cam., M.D.

 

Price: $10.00

 


 

  • Volume 1,  Number 2 - Fall, 1979
     

Contents:

Editorial Page

Articles

Healing Love and the Mentally III
by Sr. Gloriana Bednarski, R.S.M.

Dreams and Inner Healing
Two Case Studies
by Joseph C. Wright

Toward a Psychology of Inner Healing
by Dennis B. Guernsey, Ph.D.

Praying with the Dental Patient
William A. Corrales, D.D.S., M.Ed.

Burnout: The Long Journey Back
Eileen Rinear, R.N., B.S.

Gender Identity Change in a Transsexual: An Exorcism
David H. Barlow, Ph.D., Gene G. Abel, M.D. & Edward B. Blanchard

Problems of Silva Mind Control
Carlos Mantica A.

Letters to the Editor

Poetry
A Meditation on Isaiah 41:13
Stir My Spirit

Media Review
More of Books by A.C.T. Members

Memorial
Reflections on the Death of Sr. Mary Jane Linn, C.S.J.

Sharings

Question Corner

Price: $10.00
 


 


 

  • Volume 1, Number 1 - Summer, 1979

Contents:

Editorial Page

Articles
ACT – Its Roots
by Sally & Martin Lynch

A Physician’s View of the Healing Ministry
by Hank Kankowski, M.D.

The Power of Prayer in Psychotherapy
by Mabel Kamp, A.C.S.W.

Deliverance from Non-Demonic Bondages
by Clinton Connor, M.A., A.C.S.W.

Anointing with Blessed Oil
by Phocion Park, M.A.

Some Thoughts of Inner Healing for Women
by Sister Antonella Bayer, C.S.J.

One Model for a Christian Therapy Center
by William L. Carr, Ed.D.

Poetry
The Infinite Sea
The House of God
The Problem Corner
Prayer by R.N. at Work

Media Review
Review of Books by A.C.T. Members

Memorial
Reflections on the Death of Sr. Mary Jane Linn, C.S.J.

Sharings
A.C.T. Conference in Rochester

 

Price: $10.00

 

Back Issues will appear on this page as soon as they become available!

 


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